licensed and unlicensed providers, the match

When it comes to fleet insurance, glazing sees ‘offbeat’ competition between licensed and unlicensed providers. In fact, glazing stands out from other automotive after-sales items. Because to circumvent the increase in premiums following claims, large fleets take out the glazing of the insurance and take charge of it in self-insurance.

The threshold often put forward by service providers is fifty vehicles, beyond which companies consider whether to switch to self-insurance. “Beyond 1,000 vehicles, they take out the glass breakage insurance,” says Stéphane Saubesty, manager…

When it comes to fleet insurance, glazing sees ‘offbeat’ competition between licensed and unlicensed providers. In fact, glazing stands out from other automotive after-sales items. Because to circumvent the increase in premiums following claims, large fleets take out the glazing of the insurance and take charge of it in self-insurance.

The threshold often put forward by service providers is fifty vehicles, beyond which companies consider whether to switch to self-insurance. “Beyond 1,000 vehicles, they remove glass breakage from insurance,” says Stéphane Saubesty, major account sales manager at Mondial Pare-Brise.

Nevertheless, insured fleets represent an important market, structured by insurance companies. These give approvals to service providers to whom the insured are sent. This creates “offbeat” competition between licensed and unlicensed providers. Without entering into the debate on the legitimacy and method of granting these approvals, approved service providers actually benefit from a facility: that of automatically receiving insured clients. Unlicensed service providers must therefore seek out these clients. And that’s the rub.

Insurance and glazing: clever commercial strategies to attract fleets

For Frédéric Fourgous, Managing Director of Actiglass, “these approved competitors disrupt the market in an unfair way. For example, they offer gifts to companies, such as game consoles, and include the price in their services. And companies let themselves be seduced by this commercial strategy without knowing the real costs of the service, explains Frédéric Fourgous. Indeed, it is their insurer or their broker who bears these costs. But according to him, insurers are starting to react, by blocking if necessary the assignment of receivables from which the repairer benefits once the service has been completed.

But the problem remains. “Fleets are less sensitive to this problem, but everything also depends on their structure. Weakly structured, with strong local decision-making powers, they are also subject to the phenomenon of trade war between approved and non-approved”, emphasizes Frédéric Fourgous. The answer: build a real commercial policy to target self-insured companies. Something Actiglass has started to do, as have other service providers. And this regardless of their commitment to insured fleets and their insurance approvals.

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